Basic FAQ. If you need more information or help, please contact our Customer Service.

FAQ

  1. 1
    CAN I PURCHASE DIRECT FROM POWERWINCH?

    Powerwinch products are available through our website using ‘Order enquiry’, via e-mail and through authorized dealers. Check Contact section to find the nearest dealer to you.

  2. 2
    WHERE DO I TAKE MY WINCH IF IT NEEDS SERVICE, WARRANTY WORK, OR ANY REPAIRS?

    If you have any problems with your winch or if your winch needs repair, we have several Authorized Servive Centers, with specially trained service technicians that can service or repair your winch. To find out where is the nearest ASC, please contact our Customer Service.

  3. 3
    WHAT PAYMENT METHODS ARE AVAILABLE?

    We accept payment made by PayPal, PayU and wire transfer.

  4. 4
    DOES THE PRICE INCLUDE TAXES?

    All of prices shown on our website are including taxes. If you’re EU Citizen and you have company with registered European VAT, you can buy our products without Value Added Tax (23%), if you’re not from EU you can always buy products without VAT.

  5. 5
    IS POWERWINCH's WARRANTY INTERNATIONAL?

    Yes, Powerwinch warranty is international, but remember that if you have any issues with our products, please contact your dealer first.

Ask yourself the following questions as you determine what type of winch will fit your needs

How to choose a winch?

  1. WHAT PULLING RATE DO YOU NEED?

    Recommended winch capacity over vehicle weight. Typically manufacturers and resellers will suggest you should calculate the winch rating by taking the gross vehicle weight and multiplying it by 1.5 and that would be your minimum winch size. But this minimum rating is just that, a minimum. Certain factors can quickly cause your winch capacity to be exceeded so you need to think about your intended usage. Be aware that certain terrains and situations can put a much greater demand on a winch over the typical 1.5 multiplication rule of thumb. For instance a common cause for winching is mud. Mud however has an incredible suction force on a stuck vehicle and in many cases that 1.5 rule of thumb is far inadequate. Steep hills and frequent winching also put great demand on an electric winch. Understanding the purpose and safe use of winch accessories such as a snatch block can be invaluable when you need it most.

  2. HOW OFTEN AND HOW HARD ARE YOU PLANNING TO USE A WINCH?

    This is an important factor in deciding what type of winch motor you will want to buy. Permanent magnet motors vs. series wound vs. Hydraulic winches. Each has an intended purpose. Light duty winching and a permanent magnet motor winch will do. More heavy and more frequent winching and you should consider a Series Wound winch. If you winch all day long, then consider a Hydraulic winch. Powerwinch covers all three types.

  3. WHAT IS YOUR BUDGET?

    For many of us, it all comes down to available cash and this is what is going to dictate what winch we are going to buy. Of course we’d love to get the top of the line  EUR 1500 extreme winch but we have to be frugal. So for those of use on a budget, we have to decide how much money we have available. This money amount will have to cover the winch, the accessories and possibly a new front bumper or mounting kit. You may even have to consider installation if you are not confident about installation. If you’ll be using winch occasionally, in standard weather conditions, do not overpay e.g. for top sealings. It will be better if you spend this amount on indispensable accessories.

  4. DO YOU HAVE ANY WEIGHT OR DIMENSIONAL LIMITATIONS OR REQUIREMENTS?

    The weight of the winch can vary somewhat. If you’re primary consideration is to keep weight down, you may want to pay attention to those specifications. More important may be the dimensions of your winch. There are many aftermarket bumpers where the winch mounts internally. Therefore size may matter. Of the many different types of winches on the market, the sizes and dimensions can vary considerably.

    Solenoid mounting can be a major consideration. Winches can either have an Integrated or Remote Solenoid pack. A remote solenoid is externally mounted off of the winch. An integrated solenoid is part of the winch either within a “bridge” over the cable or mounted else where on the winch such as above the motor. There are benefits to both types of solenoid mounting options. With space restrictions a remote solenoid can reduce the space require to mount the winch itself while the solenoid can be mounted remotely while an integrated solenoid offers protection in a compact package.

  5. WHAT KIND OF ROPE SHOULD YOU CHOOSE?

    You have two basic choices, wire rope and synthetic rope. Both will do the job and each have plusses and minuses. They both are rated for strength via diameter and the tensile strength of their materials. In the common 6,000-15,000 recreational 4×4 winch, cable diameters of 8-12 MM are seen in both wire and synthetic ropes. Tensile strength, the point at which the rope breaks (a.k.a. “parts”) varies according to type, characteristics and diameter, but is higher than the pull rating of the winch. Their ratings have some reserve for a safety factor to account for wear and minor damage.

    Wire Rope

    Wire Rope: Wire rope is the traditional choice. It’s made up of strands of carbon steel wire, usually seven bundles of 19 strands (a.k.a. 7×19). Less common is 6×37, which is more flexible and resistant to fatigue but less resistant to abrasion than 7×19 because of the thinner wires. With just a few exceptions, 7×19 wire rope is what comes with winches from the factory.
    On the plus side, wire rope is more resistant to abrasion than synthetic. It’s very heat resistant and relatively inexpensive. On the downside, it vulnerable to crushing when not properly respooled. It’s relatively heavy, with a 120 foot roll of 5/16 cable weighing about 28 pounds with a hook. Wire rope can be spliced but not easily or by novices. Individual wire strands routinely break and create small hooks that rend flesh, so gloves are vital. Wire rope can store large amounts of kinetic energy and can whip with deadly effect if something breaks loose.

    Synthetic Winch Rope

    Synthetic Winch Rope: Synthetic winch ropes are the new kid on the block and there’s lots to talk about. As few premium winch packages come new with synthetic rope. Powerwinch is offering a synthetic rope upgrade to every winch, so you can buy the rope separately.
    On the plus side, synthetic is light; a 28 m. roll with a hook weighs about 3 kgs. Synthetic generally drops dead with minimal “snap” when something breaks. It’s often stronger than an equivalent diameter wire rope and has appendage-friendly surfaces. It floats and in an emergency you can tie a knot into it. Knots do weaken it but if you perform a long splice at a break, it’s as good as new. Splicing 12 strand rope is lots easier than wire rope.

    Synthetic rope also has a few disadvantages. It’s more susceptible to chafing than wire rope. It has a high initial cost, though it’s superior performance makes it a good value overall. The most significant potential operational problem has to do with synthetic’s ability to withstand heat. The common planetary winch has a one-way brake built into the center of the winch drum. When spooling out under power, i.e. lowering the vehicle under a load, that brake will generate some serious heat. Winch manufacturers caution against this lowering practice and advise doing it only in short 20 foot increments with long cooling periods. Rope damage from heat can go unseen on that first layer and damage may start occurring at temperatures as low as 150 degrees.
    There are several ways around the temperature dilemma. Some winch rope has a higher temperature resistance but comes with lower tensile strength, so you would have to use a larger diameter rope to maintain the same tensile strength. An interesting cure is to have enough of the high temp rope spliced onto a stronger rope to cover the first later of the drum. Larger diameter rope can be splices to smaller to compensate for the strength difference. An even easier solution is to place an insulating sheath of nylon over that first layer. The easiest solution is to follow the winch manufacturer’s recommendation and not power out in long stretches. Remember that most worm or spur gear winches do not have this problem.

  6. WHAT ELSE WILL YOU NEED?

    Depending on your needs, you may want to consider picking up some additional items to go with your winch:

    • A mounting kit (necessary for ATV and self-recovery winches)
    • A multi-mount system (or bumper) to mount winch in either the front or rear of a vehicle
    • A receiver shackle (used in a rear receiver hitch to attach tow strap, rope, or chain)
    • A snatch block (used in a double line pull to increase the pulling capability of the winch)
    • Replacement cables
    • Fairleads
    • Tow straps
    • Gloves
    • Additional remote
    • Winch cover
You will find there product manuals, connecting diagrams and lot more.

Downloads

  1. MANUALS

    You’ve lost your manual? You will find there anything you need!

    1. Powerwinch PW12000/13000E
  2. DIAGRAMS

    Wiring diagrams to our winches.

    1. Powerwinch PW12000-PW15000
  3. OTHER STUFF